How to Plant a Garden in New Mexico

The growing environment in the majority of New Mexico offers obstacles to planting a successful garden. Knowledge and preparation can resolve the negative impacts of typical issues such as unrelenting summer season heat, seasonal rainfall, and uncooperative soil. Before planting a garden in New Mexico, gather background details about your growing area, including typical rains, frost dates, optimal plant ranges and recommended planting dates for each kind of crop. New Mexico University horticulture provides suggested planting dates for spring and fall vegetable gardens organized by New Mexico areas.

Step 1

Select a site for your New Mexico garden. The site must be level and receive at least 6– ideally eight– hours of direct sunshine each day.

Step 2

Clear the location of plant product and debris. Left alone, New Mexico soil supports a wealth of various weeds that need to be eliminated totally from the garden location before planting. You can use a basic herbicide like glyphosate, solarize the soil with a covering of clear plastic sheets or by hand remove the plant material with a spade.

Step 3

Check the soil after it’s cleaned out. Take six soil samples from different locations and depths, blend together and place in a zipper-lock bag. Send out the sample to a soil analysis lab such as the Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory at New Mexico aglife. The soil will be tested for a little charge and the outcomes and amendment suggestions returned within one month.

Step 4

Till the soil to a depth of 6 to 8 inches with a shovel and fork or gas-powered tiller. Include changes suggested in the soil test report. Level the location with a rake.

Step 5

Lay out the garden area into sections that can be easily accessed. Usage wide rows, stones or mulch-covered courses in order to restrict the soil compression caused by walking around the plants throughout gathering and weeding.

Step 6

Set up a watering system for each garden area. Spring and fall in New Mexico often offer sufficient rainfall for gardens, but extra water is needed during the summer to keep the plants efficient and alive. Drip irrigation systems provide the most effective use of water for plants, however soaker hose pipes also work well. Since the moisture left on the plant leaves encourages plant diseases that prosper in main and east New Mexico humidity, gardening experts prevent overhead watering.

Step 7

Add plants at the correct time and surround the location with mulch to keep wetness and dissuade weeds.

Before planting a garden in New Mexico, collect background details about your growing region, consisting of average rainfall, frost dates, optimal plant ranges and recommended planting dates for each type of crop. New Mexico University cultivation uses suggested planting dates for spring and fall vegetable gardens organized by New Mexico areas.

Left alone, New Mexico soil supports a wealth of different weeds that require to be removed entirely from the garden area prior to planting. Spring and fall in New Mexico often supply adequate rainfall for gardens, but supplemental water is required during the summertime to keep the plants alive and productive. Gardening experts prevent overhead watering since the wetness left on the plant leaves encourages plant diseases that prosper in central and east New Mexico humidity.