Getting Ready For Summer

The cool spring weather is now a far-off memory as East Texas summertime has shown up for its extended stay. Beat the heat and humidity by doing your gardening activities in the morning and early evening. Wear a hat, and secure yourself with sun block and mosquito repellent.

Here are some educational chances this month to keep you informed on gardening and plant topics.

Tomorrow is the last of the spring series of “First Tuesday in the Garden” totally free lectures– “Natives Beat the Heat” on June 4 in the IDEA Garden during the midday hour. Master Garden enthusiasts will share their knowledge about native plants that thrive in our area. Tuesday lectures are held on the patio in the IDEA Garden, located in the southeast corner of the Tyler Rose Garden. While there, delight in the vibrant presentation gardens that the Smith County Master Gardeners maintain, including the CONCEPT Garden, Heritage Rose Garden, Sunshine Garden and the Shade Garden.

Later on in June, visit the Texas A&M Agrilife Research study and Extension Center in Overton for a take a look at the very latest plant intros. This free Cultivation Field Day is on Thursday, June 27. The early morning field day showcases the comprehensive annual bedding plant variety trials that are conducted at A&M at Overton, including sun and shade annuals and other specialty plants. Visitors get to vote for their favorites at both the North Farm, where the tour begins, and at the demonstration garden at the. After a catered lunch, Dr. Brent Pemberton, A&M AgriLife Research study Gardener at Overton, who is accountable for the trials, and Jimmy Turner and Jenny Wegley of the Dallas Arboretum, will give highlights in the auditorium of brand-new plant intros and results of plant trials. For more details, visit http://flowers.tamu.edu

In the Garden.

Lawn Care. The hotter weather condition of June promotes faster growth of grass, so stay up to date with the mowing. To avoid worrying the grass, remove no more than 1/3 of the overall length of the turf blade each time you cut. You might have to mow frequently, every 5 or 6 days instead of every 7 to 10 days. Let the clippings fall back into the lawn recycles plant nutrients. Trim more often if clippings are noticeable after trimming. Cutting often at the correct height will promote a healthy, thick grass resistant to weeds.
Grey areas with black border early indications of grey leaf area fungal illness on St. Augustine lawn

For Bermuda lawns that are making poor growth thus far this year, make a second application of fertilizer. For finest results, use a fertilizer with a high percentage of nitrogen in the slow- release kind so the turf won’t grow rather so rapidly. A damp, hot June, paired with lushly growing turf from high rates of nitrogen combine to promote Grey Leaf Area, a fungal illness of St. Augustine yard. This summertime illness triggers yellowing and in severe cases, serious thinning of the turf, specifically in shady areas or in low spots that tend to remain wet. If your St. Augustine is thick and rapidly growing, skip the summer season application.

Know how big your lawn is so you know what does it cost? fertilizer to apply. Examine the bag for recommendations. Common application rates for typical fertilizer analyses might be 5 pounds of 21-7-14 per 1000 square feet, or 6 pounds of 15-5-10 per 1000 square feet. Do not exceed these rates.

The guideline for watering is to apply enough to damp the soil 6 inches deep. Do not water too frequently. Shallow, frequent watering promotes a shallow root system that is more susceptible to the stress of summer heat and winter season cold.

June’s warm soils make this a perfect time to establish or refurbish the home yard. Yards for our location include Bermuda grass for all sun with no shade, and St. Augustine, centipede or zoysia for all sun or partial shade.

Blossom end rot on tomatoes

Vegetables. If you’re growing vegetables, you probably have tomatoes. Among the most common tomato disorders is blossom end rot (BER). This is not a disease however a rather physiological issue triggered by an absence of calcium and fluctuating soil moisture. BER is most extreme on large, flat fruit varieties. Do not let the soil completely dry in between watering or rain, but keep the soil more uniformly damp. Mulching assists save moisture to lessen this problem. Before planting the next crop of tomatoes, lime the soil to offer calcium. BER typically just affects the first tomatoes to ripen.

Tomatoes, peppers and other garden plants benefit from a side dressing of fertilizer (mainly nitrogen) to keep them energetic and efficient throughout summer. The extra nitrogen promotes leafy growth on peppers which will assist avoid sun scald on the fruit.

Mulching. A major job each summer is to make sure our gardens do not suffer from absence of water. Mulching flowers, vegetables and shrubs is one easy way to lower the frequency we need to keep our plants watered. Mulch materials, like wood chips, shredded leaves, pine straw and bark, in a layer 2 to 4 inches deep, will help conserve water and keep plants healthier.

Tomorrow is the last of the spring series of “First Tuesday in the Garden” complimentary lectures– “Natives Beat the Heat” on June 4 in the CONCEPT Garden during the midday hour. Tuesday lectures are held on the patio in the IDEA Garden, located in the southeast corner of the Tyler Rose Garden. While there, take pleasure in the dynamic demonstration gardens that the Smith County Master Gardeners preserve, consisting of the CONCEPT Garden, Heritage Rose Garden, Sunlight Garden and the Shade Garden.
The morning field day showcases the comprehensive annual bed linen plant range trials that are carried out at A&M at Overton, consisting of sun and shade annuals and other specialty plants. A significant job each summer season is to make sure our gardens do not suffer from absence of water.